Monday, September 1, 2014

U.S. forces carry out operation against al-Shabaab in Somalia




U.S. military forces carried out an operation on Monday against al Shabaab militants in Somalia, a U.S. Department of Defense spokesman said.
"We are assessing the results of the operation and will provide additional information as and when appropriate," Pentagon spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby said in a statement.
No further details about the operation in the African country were immediately available.
Al Shabaab is an Islamist group affiliated with al Qaeda that wants to impose its own strict version of Islam in Somalia. It ruled most of the southern region of Somalia from 2006 until 2011, when African peacekeeping troops marched into the capital, Mogadishu.
African and Somali forces have regained several towns this year, but rebels still hold other centers and tracts of countryside.  Source (Reuters)

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Director Tewdros Teshome is sued for copy right breach by the author of Fiker Sibekel .




Tewdros Teshome, a renowned film maker and manager of Sebastopol Entertainment Plc, is sued for breach of copyright by Atenkut Mulugeta, author of the book Fiker Sibekel. The plaintiff filed his statement of claim to the Federal High Court on Tuesday, August 19, 2014, claiming Tewodros took the entire concept of his book and released a movie called Sost Meazen. The suit demands that Tewodros pay him 10 million Br in compensation for the economic and moral damage he suffered from the infringement. Tewodros came into the film business as writer, director and producer of Gilbit Alem, which he followed up with Kezkaza Wolafen. This came after he had established Sebastopol Entertainment Plc, his film company. He has made nine films in total, including the contentious Sost Meazen, as well as Fiqer Siferd (2005), one of his more popular films, and Key Sihtet (2006) – a film about the Red Terror. The entire storyline of the film and scenes in Sost Meazen are copied from Fiker Sibekel, which was published five years ago, alleges the suit.  Source ( Diretube)

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Wayne Rooney: England name Man Utd striker as new captain



Manchester United striker Wayne Rooney has been named the new England captain by manager Roy Hodgson. The 28-year-old takes over from Liverpool's Steven Gerrard, who retired after England's World Cup elimination. Rooney has 40 goals in 95 appearances, and was named club captain by United boss Louis van Gaal earlier this month. "It is something I will take massive pride in doing. To be appointed captain is beyond my wildest dreams. " said Rooney on his official website. England play Norway at Wembley on 3 September in a friendly before their Euro 2016 qualifying campaign starts in Switzerland on 8 September. Hodgson has named four uncapped players in his latest squad, with Arsenal's 19-year-old defender Calum Chambers, and Newcastle's Jack Colback, Tottenham's Danny Rose and Aston Villa's Fabian Delph, all 24, in line to make their international debuts. Speaking on Rooney's appointment, Hodgson said: "I gave it a lot of thought but Wayne is an obvious choice."He's the right man and he'll show enormous enthusiasm and responsibility."
Source ( BBC Sport )  

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

August 24, 2014 Ethiopian This Week Radio program




August 24, 2014 program presents celebration of Nento Cultural poetic jazz At national theater in Addis abeba  . Various poems accompanied Jazz music, stage theater  and  group song  by Merwa musical band were presented  during the episode  . Click the link below to listen the program.

Al-Sisi voices willingness to visit Ethiopia up to 3 times to resolve dam issue




President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi said Sunday Egypt is working to ensure that the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) does not damage its water interests or reduce Egypt’s “historical share of water”. Al-Sisi added that he does not mind visiting Ethiopia, “once, twice or even three times in order to resolve the issue in a way that completely preserves Egypt’s share of Nile water.” The president was cited by state-run MENA as saying this to the editors-in-chief of newspapers and news services, including MENA’s. His statements come hours ahead of the beginning of a new round of tripartite negotiations between Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan on GERD, which will be held in the Sudanese capital Khartoum on Monday and Tuesday. Egypt’s Water and Irrigation Minister Hossam El-Din Moghazy and the delegation he is leading were received Sunday afternoon by his Sudanese counterpart Motaz Mousa. Before starting his trip, Moghazy said the negotiations would start on Monday and that there would be no turning back, state-run Al-Ahram reported. Mousa was cited by MENA as saying that the atmosphere of the negotiations is dominated by optimism to achieve positive results that satisfy all parties. The last round of tripartite talks was held in January but ended without reaching an agreement. It was preceded by tripartite talks in November and December of last year, but these also failed. Moghazy said the upcoming talks would be held based on the results of the meeting between Al-Sisi and Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn on the sidelines of the African Union summit in June. Al-Sisi said he received promises from Desalegn during the talks that the dam would have no negative effects whatsoever on Egypt’s share of water, whether during construction, operation or during filling the dam lake. Following the meeting, Egypt and Ethiopia agreed to form a joint committee to streamline discussions on GERD. The agreement, which outlined seven steps for the continuing construction of the dam, was formulated by the foreign ministers of both countries, but was directly overseen and endorsed by Al-Sisi and Desalegn. Both nations hailed the agreement as a “new chapter in relations between Egypt and Ethiopia… based on openness and mutual understanding and cooperation.” Egypt’s Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry called Ethiopian counterpart Tedros Adhanom on Thursday and the two sides agreed to continue communication during the time of the tripartite talks and to facilitate negotiations if necessary. Egypt and Ethiopia have been locked in a diplomatic dispute over GERD, since Egypt fears that the dam will affect its share of Nile water. Downstream countries Egypt and Sudan together receive the majority of Nile water. As per agreements signed in 1929 and 1959, Egypt annually receives 55.5bn cubic metres of the estimated total 84bn cubic metres of Nile water produced each year and Sudan receives 18.5bn cubic metres. However, the two water sharing agreements, which guarantee Egypt the lion’s share of water, were signed in the absence of Ethiopia. In February, bilateral talks between Egypt and Ethiopia ended after failure to resolve key points of debate between the two countries. During a meeting with Adhanom in June, Al-Sisi said that Egypt understands Ethiopia’s development needs but added that this must go hand-in-hand with Ethiopian understanding of Egypt’s water needs, and that Egypt has no alternatives to the Nile for its growing water needs. In 2013, while serving as Minister of Defence, Al-Sisi rejected the idea of using military force to resolve water issues. Despite Shoukry’s prior indication that he would visit Addis Ababa, the foreign minister went to Saudi Arabia on Saturday to attend a meeting with the purpose of finding a political solution to the crisis in Syria. Source (Daily News Egypt)

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Special Operation forces failed to rescue James Foley From Islamic State Captors in Syria




President Barack Obama ordered the secret operation, the first of its kind by the U.S. inside Syrian territory since the start of the civil war, after the U.S. received intelligence the Americans were being held by the extremist group known as Islamic State at a specific facility in a sparsely populated area inside Syria. Among the group, intelligence agencies believed at the time, was James Foley, the U.S. journalist whose beheading was shown in a grisly video released Tuesday. U.S. Special Operations forces previously mounted an unsuccessful mission inside Syria to rescue American journalist James Foley. The operation sought to rescue several Americans held by Islamic State extremists.  U.S. Special Operations forces mounted an unsuccessful mission inside Syria earlier this summer to try to rescue several Americans held by Islamic extremists, including the journalist who was beheaded this week, senior Obama administration officials said.  President Barack Obama ordered the secret operation, the first of its kind by the U.S. inside Syrian territory since the start of the civil war, after the U.S. received intelligence the Americans were being held by the extremist group known as Islamic State at a specific facility in a sparsely populated area inside Syria. Among the group, intelligence agencies believed at the time, was James Foley, the U.S. journalist whose beheading was shown in a grisly video released Tuesday.The officials declined to say precisely where and when the operation took place. But its disclosure was just the latest of several signs of a toughening American posture toward the extremist forces of Islamic State, a group that Mr. Obama Wednesday labeled a "cancer" on the Middle East. Officials said that several dozen Special Operations forces took part in the helicopter-borne operation as drones and fighter aircraft circled overhead. After landing nearby and approaching the facility by foot, the force came under small-arms fire, to which it responded, the officials said. Several fighters of the Islamic State were killed in the exchange of fire. One member of the special operations forces team was shot and slightly injured, the officials said.But the U.S. forces didn't find any of the Americans in the facility and pulled out of the area. "When the opportunity presented itself, the president authorized the Department of Defense to move aggressively to recover our citizens," Lisa Monaco, assistant to the president for homeland security and counter terrorism, said in a statement. "Unfortunately, that mission was ultimately not successful because the hostages were not present."
The U.S. rescue mission wasn't coordinated with the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, a senior U.S. official said.  As the details of the attempted rescue suggest, Mr. Foley wasn't the only Westerner being held by Islamic State operatives. Approximately 20 journalists are believed to be missing in Syria, with many held by the Islamic State, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.
Philip Balboni, the president and chief executive of GlobalPost, an online news site Mr. Foley worked for, said Mr. Foley's captors originally demanded a ransom sum from both the family and GlobalPost of €100 million ($132.5 million). He declined to discuss their reply to the demand. He said all communication was shared with appropriate government authorities.
Source ( The Wall Street Journal)